Stockton, Alabama

Stockton’s Historical Sites:

The Bartram Trail follows the approximate route of eighteenth-century naturalist William Bartram’s southern journey from March, 1773 to January, 1777. Bartram explored much of the territory which is now the states of North and South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Tennessee.  The Bartram Trail Conference, Inc., was founded in 1976 to identify and mark the route of Bartram’s southern explorations and to promote interest in developing recreational trails and botanical gardens along the route.

Almost all of the long time residents of the town of Stockton are descended from Joshua Kennedy. The Kennedy family is believed to have operated the mill site until the Civil War, when the structure was burned by Union soldiers.

Mrs. Hastie, who was a life time resident, believed that the dam was used to power mills until about 1906, though the exact date is not known.

On May 4, 1796, President George Washington commissioned Major Andrew Ellicott to survey the boundary line between the United States and the Spanish colonies of East and West Florida extending from the Mississippi River to the Atlantic Ocean.  Until this time the southern portion of what is now Alabama, had been claimed by Spain.  By March of 1799, Ellicott, who had started the survey in May of 1798 on the east bank of the Mississippi River, had made his way into what is now Alabama.  Sailing up the Mobile River, he established an astronomical observatory on Seymour’s Bluff north of Mobile.  To establish a control point for his compass line that ran east to west parallel to 31’ of north latitude, he made six observations of each of four stars.  The boundary line which established the division between the Mississippi Territory and Spanish West Florida runs straight through the town of Stockton.  The survey and work was completed in 1799.  This line establishes the basis of all South Alabama surveys and was the first Southern Boundary of the United States.

The First Church on Record in the Tensaw Settlement was built in 1845 in Stockton, Alabama. Called the “Union Church”. Here, both the Presbyterians and Methodists met together in a common desire to clean up the immorality that existed.  A stairway in the building led to a balcony, where until the Civil War, blacks worshiped together with the whites.  

The church was started by Benjamin Metcalf who left $500 in his will for the erection of a church and the marking of his families graves.  The old “Union Church” was built near Gallagher’s Spring, on the south side of Highway 225 about a quarter of a mile from the junction of 225 and Highway 59, almost directly across from the spring, located on the north side of Highway 225, at the top of the hill, right before the intersection to 225 and 59.  A “man made lake now occupies the site.  Serving as the first Clerk was Gerald Byrne.

251-937-3738

To contact us:

Stockton Heritage Association                    

P. O. Box 127

Stockton, AL  36579

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251-937-3738

To contact us:

Stockton Heritage Association                    

P. O. Box 127

Stockton, AL  36579

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